Artists With Bad Karma

artists with bad karma
Artists With Bad Karma
Artists with Bad Karma Notes
Artists with bad Karma are a plague. Most of the artists I know are thoughtful people who go out of their way to be kind. Most of them have been really like a family for several years. We assimilate new people a few at a time and rotate in and out of  events during the year. I look forward to my time with them, talking shop and catching up a few times a year. Most of them would lend you their last dime, give you anything and generally tend to send patrons your way if they can’t sell to them first.
Artists with Bad Karma
They congratulate when you sell and console when you get skunked. They are amusing, droll, and  a lot of great fun to be with. They tend to not be overly competitive and are amazingly kind as a group. They befriend you whether they paint better than you or not. It really doesn’t matter to them. They simply love to paint.
Then there are the artists with bad karma. They often come across to promoters as the nicest most successful people, and they often sell well. Underneath, they are rude and  deliberately cruel to other painters. They spend a great deal of time bragging about their many sales, counting the number of sold signs on other artists walls, sneaking around with cameras to take photos of other painters work and generally making snide comments about their own superior career and that of their friends over the other artists. I actually know an artist who tried to get another artist thrown out of their own gallery with lies and innuendos.
Artists With Bad Karma
One artist like this can ruin your day and make you seethe with disgust and anger before the event is over. They have poisonous personalities with a superficial charm that can fool many. The more time you spend with them, the more you see their manipulation and mean spirited personality. They get away with it because they are cunning and they know who to suck up to look good.
Artists with Bad Karma
Then there are the types who begin to believe their own press and that they are superior to the other artists and spend a lot of time telling the person in charge that they are superior and need not follow the basic rules like framing their work, paying the usual commission and so forth. I’m talking about the important rules that all of us must follow in order to have a professional cohesive show which will help the organization to sell work. I mean artists who rarely dress appropriately for a more formal event, or who don’t bother to show up for many of the events, because they are more important than anyone else. They are late arriving, late every day and late turning in their work. They complain that they have a poor space, but they arrived last. Rules and curtesy don’t apply for them.  I’m not saying that I like going to events night after night but if I don’t want to, I should just decline the invitation. These artists need to read the contract before the event to know what is required of them.
Artists With Bad Karma
I think this kind of personality probably exists in every profession, but it is somewhat depressing to have to deal with their drama in an otherwise wonderful event. The spread poison through out the artists. They use cliques as a way to look superior and any artist who paints uniquely or unlike the “cool” people, is not so subtly shunned. I think as artists begin to excel and build a name for themselves, they need to be aware of this and to make sure they don’t start believing their own press. I have seen this happen to some truly good artists and they suffer for it in the end.
Artists with Bad Karma
I know that I don’t fit well into groups. I am a loner by nature with strong independent traits. I learned eventually that group events aren’t right for me. The politics and backstory elements are difficult for me. I have gradually eased away from many of these events and have become a better painter and a better person by removing myself from these situations . Some artists thrive in the competitive atmosphere. I do not.
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